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Link-Hillslope Decomposition

This example is for the Quartz Hill basin in western New Mexico, 35°04’59” N and 108°00’48” W, about 41 miles southwest of Grants, N.M. This basin’s drainage area is 2.13 km^2, and is a typical semi-arid setting. The basin is inside the Cibola National Forest (USDA Forest Service).

1. The Cuencas network can be overlaid on top of digital photos using Google Earth:

The Cuencas network can be overlaid on a digital photo using Google Earth.

The Cuencas network can be overlaid on a digital photo using Google Earth.

2. The Cuencas network provides a unique decomposition of the terrain into Link-Hillslope:

Decomposition of the terrain in Link-Hillslope.

Decomposition of the terrain in Link-Hillslope.

3. Does Cuencas Network reflect the network that exists on the landscape? (transparencies)

Cuencas Network reflects the network that exists on the landscape.

Cuencas Network reflects the network that exists on the landscape.

4. Does Cuencas Link-Hillslope exist on the landscape? (transparencies)

Cuencas Link-Hillslope exists on the landscape.

Cuencas Link-Hillslope exists on the landscape.

5. A three-dimensional look allows us to understand the meaning of this decomposition in terms of landscape features (and interior and an exterior link).

A three-dimensional look.

A three-dimensional look.

 

6. The decomposition is consistent with landscape features throughout the network.

The decomposition is consistent with landscape features throughout the network.

The decomposition is consistent with landscape features throughout the network.

 

7. Any other decomposition of this basin (e.g., catchment in the sense of MIKE-SHE or planes in the sense of KINEROS) would require equations that account for the aggregation that is being done.

The Quartz Hill Outlet.

The Quartz Hill Outlet.

 7. Google it yourself! Get the overlay here

Last modified on January 18th, 2013
Posted on January 18th, 2013