Skip to Content

Water Sustainability Courses

Featured Course!

Students in this course learn to use field equipment to measure water quality.

Students in this course learn to use field equipment to measure water quality.

Field Methods in Hydrologic Science is offered each spring semester for upper-level undergraduate and graduate students. The course emphasizes hands-on experience with field equipment for students, including weekly laboratory experiences and multiple field trips during the semester. Curriculum includes both physical hydrologic and hydraulic measurements, and an introduction to environmental water-quality measurement and monitoring. This course fills the requirement for a field-based experience for the Environmental Science degree program. Upon completion of the course and passing the final exam, students earn certification as a Hydrologic Technician from the American Institute of Hydrology.

Topics in Mass Communication: Risk Communication

Students learn techniques to communicate the risks of our society with the general public.

Students learn techniques to communicate the risks of our society with the general public.

Did you know that more people die from lung cancer than plane accidents? Then why are people more likely to find alternative transportation than make the decision to quit smoking? We can justify a number of risky behaviors in our lives because of our basic perception of risk. Whether you are are journalist, scientist, engineer, or are interested in public policy, you need to know how to talk about the risks of our society with the general public.

019:169:005 (JCM:3832) Professor K. Dalrymple

Water Resources

This course introduces you to the science and policy issues affecting water resources management in the United States. We will focus on how the intersection of people, climate, technology, and geography affects the quality, availability, and demand for freshwater resources. The major goals of the course are for you to better understand basic hydrological processes, the water needs of people and ecosystems, the influence of public policy on water quality, availability, and natural hazards, and historical and contemporary developments in the management of water.

041:111:001 (GEOG:2930) Professor E. Tate

Hazards and Society

From Hurricane Katrina and the 2010 Haiti earthquake to the 2011 tsunami-induced nuclear meltdown in Japan, disasters are inflicting an ever-increasing toll on the health and wealth of nations and communities. This course explores the impact and societal responses to natural and technological hazards. Using case studies from around the world, we will focus on the relationship between extreme events, human behavior, disaster management, public policy, and technology to understand what makes people and places vulnerable to hazards.

044:175:001 (GEOG:3760) Professor E. Tate

Other Courses Taught By WSI Members

Environmental Toxicology

In this course, we will explore the sources, routes of absorption, and effects of environmental toxicants affecting man; pathophysiology of toxicant actions, including those of air and water pollutants, metals, pesticides, solvents, food toxicants, and chemicals.

175:260:001 (OEH:5810) Profs. G. Ludewig, H. Lehmler, L. Fuortes

 

Tags: , , , , , , , , , ,
Last modified on July 14th, 2015
Posted on August 16th, 2013