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Core Faculty Research

Forbes Lab—Department of Chemistry

This is a uranium citrate complex, an important species that exists in soil systems.

This is a uranium citrate complex, an important species that exists in soil systems.

Actinides are a major source of radioactivity associated with nuclear waste, and their transport in environmental systems is enhanced through adsorption onto small (1–5 nm) nanoparticles. Tori Forbes’ research group synthesizes novel actinide nanomaterials that are used as geochemical model compounds to enhance our understanding of the mobility of nuclear materials in environmental systems. Single-crystal X-ray diffraction and synchrotron techniques, such as high-energy X-ray scattering, are used to provide a molecular-level understanding of the structural characteristics of the 232Th and 238U complexes that will aid in the development of novel remediation methods for nuclear materials.

Hard at work in the Forbes Lab.

Hard at work in the Forbes Lab.

Lehmler Lab—Department of Occupational and Environmental Health

Lehmler (left) prepares a reagent for the derivatization of PCB metabolites. (Right) Adrianna Jarosz discussed enantioselective analyses with Izabela Korwel (Photos by Korwel Photography).

Lehmler (left) prepares a reagent for the derivatization of PCB metabolites. (Right) Adrianna Jarosz discussed enantioselective analyses with Izabela Korwel (Photos by Korwel Photography).

Hans-Joachim Lehmler is associate professor in the Department of Occupational and Environmental Health. His research focuses on the health effects of chiral water contaminants, such as polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), legacy pesticides, and musk fragrances. Specifically, he is interested in the role of enantioselective biotransformation processes in aquatic and mammalian species in the adverse effects of chiral contaminants. His research employs methods from different disciplines, including organic synthesis, analytical chemistry, and chemical toxicology.

Analyzing samples from PCB-treated animals. (Left) Austin Kammerer; (center) Austin Kammerer and Xianai Wu; and (right) Adrianna Jarosz. (Photos by Korwel Photography)

Analyzing samples from PCB-treated animals. (Left) Austin Kammerer; (center) Austin Kammerer and Xianai Wu; and (right) Adrianna Jarosz. (Photos by Korwel Photography)

Tate Lab—Department of Geography

Professor Eric Tate’s research focuses on the creation and application of quantitative indicators, used to represent abstract dynamics such as social vulnerability to flood hazards, and water sustainability of regions and communities. This work involves developing conceptual frameworks, constructing geospatial models, and connecting outputs to real-world practice. The overall goal is to develop reliable indicators that are theoretically grounded, analytically robust, broadly accessible, and relevant for decision-making.

Just Lab—Civil and Environmental Engineering

Craig Just (back, second from right) with members of his research group.

Craig Just (back, second from right) with members of his research group.

Craig Just’s Research Group deals with the measurement and quantification of nitrogen cycle fluxes and stores, with a particular focus on aerobic/anaerobic interfaces in aquatic and engineered ecosystems and with recognized expertise in chemical sensing and modeling. The group also studies the ability of citizen-centric sustainability education and community engagement activities to influence representative democracy such that globally-minded, interdisciplinary policies and solutions can be implemented by increasingly diverse and interconnected populations.

(Left) Physical lab model and (right) pimpleback mussel.

(Left) Physical lab model and (right) pimpleback mussel.

 

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Last modified on July 14th, 2015
Posted on August 7th, 2013