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All News and Pages Related to "water quality"

Water Communication: A New Field

Posted on June 4th, 2014

One of Kajsa Dalrymple’s chores was to help wash the family’s fruits and vegetables with iodine-laced water every day — to an 8-year-old, it seemed like a boring, unnecessary job. Standing at the sink, she sighed and rolled her eyes. “Why do we have to do this?” she asked her mother. Her mother, a civil […]

Water Quality — Everyone’s Responsibility?

Posted on June 4th, 2014

Farmer Brian Scott turns to look over his shoulder at the 60-foot wide, 24-row corn planter as it rolls through the field. Soon, however, Scott’s eyes settle back on a computer screen in the tractor cab. The screen shows a digital map of the route he set up for the tractor to follow through the […]

J.V. Loperfido: Going with the Flow

Posted on May 20th, 2014

Computer modeling is invaluable for a water-quality researcher, but IIHR alumnus J.V. Loperfido still likes to get his feet wet. “I think you gain a lot of insight from being out in the stream,” the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) researcher says. Loperfido says he learned the value of field studies at IIHR, where he earned […]

IIHR's Dan Ceynar served as a consultant on this children's book by Ellen Lawrence.

New Book Raises Awareness of Polluted Waterways

Posted on March 21st, 2014

IIHR’s Dan Ceynar acted as a consultant on a new children’s book by Ellen Lawrence, Poisoned Rivers and Lakes.

Tim Mattes says there is great interest in new methods to clean up PCEs and TCEs in the groundwater.

Cleaning Up Groundwater Contaminants

Posted on November 13th, 2013

IIHR Associate Research Engineer Tim Mattes is exploring the use of micro-organisms to transform vinyl chlorides in the groundwater into an environmentally benign product.

Bioremediation: Cleaning Up Groundwater

Posted on November 13th, 2013

Magic Microbes You might call Tim Mattes a magician of sorts — he may not pull a rabbit out of his hat, but he can transform known human carcinogens into a safer substance, using only naturally-occurring microbes. With funding from the National Science Foundation, the IIHR associate research engineer is exploring the use of micro-organisms […]

Water-Quality Monitoring Sensor Network

Posted on September 11th, 2013

IIHR’s water-quality initiative represents an unprecedented effort to monitor real-time changes in a large river in response to climatic events, agricultural trends, and other human activities. Researchers at LACMRERS have 10 Hydrolab multi-sonde water-quality monitors deployed in Pool 16 for detailed chemical analysis. The sensors provide continuous real-time monitoring of: Dissolved oxygen Temperature Specific conductance […]

Sampling and Monitoring

Posted on September 11th, 2013

IIHR Assistant Research Scientist Carrie Davis is leading an effort to develop a real-time water-quality monitoring program on Iowa rivers, and at Lake Odessa in Louisa County, Iowa. Read more about Davis’ research … Species concentrations in real time Monitoring Lake Odessa What is the influence of Lake to high nitrate concentration taken from the […]

IIHR Director Larry Weber (right) leads the Iowa Watersheds Project, which is focused on how farm ponds and other constructed improvements can make a difference in reducing flood damage. Team members include: (l to r) Chad Drake, Sara Steussy, Nick Thomas, Marian Muste, Matt Wunsch, and Will Klingner.

A Watershed Moment

Posted on August 19th, 2013

Larry Weber says he wanted to make sure the Iowa Watersheds Project included funding to build improvements in the watersheds that could make a measurable difference.

Anton Krueger (right) holds one of the back-wearing mussels, plucked from the laboratory microhabitat. From left, the team includes Craig just, Jim Niemeier, Jon Durst, and Hannah Taylor.

Mussel Obsession

Posted on July 30th, 2013

IIHR’s Anton Kruger (right) has been named a new Donald E. Bently Faculty Fellow in Engineering, in recognition of his innovative research and dedication to students. Read about Kruger’s project using river mussels as water-quality sensors.

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